Scott Hanselman

What is Serverless Computing? Exploring Azure Functions

August 27, '16 Comments [21] Posted in Azure | nodejs
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There's a lot of confusing terms in the Cloud space. And that's not counting the term "Cloud." ;)

  • IaaS (Infrastructure as a Services) - Virtual Machines and stuff on demand.
  • PaaS (Platform as a Service) - You deploy your apps but try not to think about the Virtual Machines underneath. They exist, but we pretend they don't until forced.
  • SaaS (Software as a Service) - Stuff like Office 365 and Gmail. You pay a subscription and you get email/whatever as a service. It Just Works.

"Serverless Computing" doesn't really mean there's no server. Serverless means there's no server you need to worry about. That might sound like PaaS, but it's higher level that than.

Serverless Computing is like this - Your code, a slider bar, and your credit card. You just have your function out there and it will scale as long as you can pay for it. It's as close to "cloudy" as The Cloud can get.

Serverless Computing is like this. Your code, a slider bar, and your credit card.

With Platform as a Service, you might make a Node or C# app, check it into Git, deploy it to a Web Site/Application, and then you've got an endpoint. You might scale it up (get more CPU/Memory/Disk) or out (have 1, 2, n instances of the Web App) but it's not seamless. It's totally cool, to be clear, but you're always aware of the servers.

New cloud systems like Amazon Lambda and Azure Functions have you upload some code and it's running seconds later. You can have continuous jobs, functions that run on a triggered event, or make Web APIs or Webhooks that are just a function with a URL.

I'm going to see how quickly I can make a Web API with Serverless Computing.

I'll go to http://functions.azure.com and make a new function. If you don't have an account you can sign up free.

Getting started with Azure Functions

You can make a function in JavaScript or C#.

Getting started with Azure Functions - Create This Function

Once you're into the Azure Function Editor, click "New Function" and you've got dozens of templates and code examples for things like:

  • Find a face in an image and store the rectangle of where the face is.
  • Run a function and comment on a GitHub issue when a GitHub webhook is triggered
  • Update a storage blob when an HTTP Request comes in
  • Load entities from a database or storage table

I figured I'd change the first example. It is a trigger that sees an image in storage, calls a cognitive services API to get the location of the face, then stores the data. I wanted to change it to:

  • Take an image as input from an HTTP Post
  • Draw a rectangle around the face
  • Return the new image

You can do this work from Git/GitHub but for easy stuff I'm literally doing it all in the browser. Here's what it looks like.

Azure Functions can be done in the browser

I code and iterate and save and fail fast, fail often. Here's the starter code I based it on. Remember, that this is a starter function that runs on a triggered event, so note its Run()...I'm going to change this.

#r "Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage"
#r "Newtonsoft.Json"

using System.Net;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Net.Http.Headers;
using Newtonsoft.Json;
using Microsoft.WindowsAzure.Storage.Table;
using System.IO; 

public static async Task Run(Stream image, string name, IAsyncCollector<FaceRectangle> outTable, TraceWriter log)
{
    var image = await req.Content.ReadAsStreamAsync();
    
    string result = await CallVisionAPI(image); //STREAM
    log.Info(result); 

    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(result))
    {
        return req.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest);
    }

    ImageData imageData = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<ImageData>(result);
    foreach (Face face in imageData.Faces)
    {
        var faceRectangle = face.FaceRectangle;
        faceRectangle.RowKey = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
        faceRectangle.PartitionKey = "Functions";
        faceRectangle.ImageFile = name + ".jpg";
        await outTable.AddAsync(faceRectangle); 
    }
    return req.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, "Nice Job");  
}

static async Task<string> CallVisionAPI(Stream image)
{
    using (var client = new HttpClient())
    {
        var content = new StreamContent(image);
        var url = "https://api.projectoxford.ai/vision/v1.0/analyze?visualFeatures=Faces";
        client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Add("Ocp-Apim-Subscription-Key", Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("Vision_API_Subscription_Key"));
        content.Headers.ContentType = new MediaTypeHeaderValue("application/octet-stream");
        var httpResponse = await client.PostAsync(url, content);

        if (httpResponse.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK){
            return await httpResponse.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
        }
    }
    return null;
}

public class ImageData {
    public List<Face> Faces { get; set; }
}

public class Face {
    public int Age { get; set; }
    public string Gender { get; set; }
    public FaceRectangle FaceRectangle { get; set; }
}

public class FaceRectangle : TableEntity {
    public string ImageFile { get; set; }
    public int Left { get; set; }
    public int Top { get; set; }
    public int Width { get; set; }
    public int Height { get; set; }
}

GOAL: I'll change this Run() and make this listen for an HTTP request that contains an image, read the image that's POSTed in (ya, I know, no validation), draw rectangle around detected faces, then return a new image.

public static async Task<HttpResponseMessage> Run(HttpRequestMessage req, TraceWriter log) {
var image = await req.Content.ReadAsStreamAsync();

As for the body of this function, I'm 20% sure I'm using too many MemoryStreams but they are getting disposed so take this code as a initial proof of concept. However, I DO need at least the two I have. Regardless, happy to chat with those who know more, but it's more subtle than even I thought. That said, basically call out to the API, get back some face data that looks like this:

2016-08-26T23:59:26.741 {"requestId":"8be222ff-98cc-4019-8038-c22eeffa63ed","metadata":{"width":2808,"height":1872,"format":"Jpeg"},"faces":[{"age":41,"gender":"Male","faceRectangle":{"left":1059,"top":671,"width":466,"height":466}},{"age":41,"gender":"Male","faceRectangle":{"left":1916,"top":702,"width":448,"height":448}}]}

Then take that data and DRAW a Rectangle over the faces detected.

public static async Task<HttpResponseMessage> Run(HttpRequestMessage req, TraceWriter log)
{
    var image = await req.Content.ReadAsStreamAsync();

    MemoryStream mem = new MemoryStream();
    image.CopyTo(mem); //make a copy since one gets destroy in the other API. Lame, I know.
    image.Position = 0;
    mem.Position = 0;
    
    string result = await CallVisionAPI(image); 
    log.Info(result); 

    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(result)) {
        return req.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest);
    }
    
    ImageData imageData = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<ImageData>(result);

    MemoryStream outputStream = new MemoryStream();
    using(Image maybeFace = Image.FromStream(mem, true))
    {
        using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(maybeFace))
        {
            Pen yellowPen = new Pen(Color.Yellow, 4);
            foreach (Face face in imageData.Faces)
            {
                var faceRectangle = face.FaceRectangle;
                g.DrawRectangle(yellowPen, 
                    faceRectangle.Left, faceRectangle.Top, 
                    faceRectangle.Width, faceRectangle.Height);
            }
        }
        maybeFace.Save(outputStream, ImageFormat.Jpeg);
    }
    
    var response = new HttpResponseMessage()
    {
        Content = new ByteArrayContent(outputStream.ToArray()),
        StatusCode = HttpStatusCode.OK,
    };
    response.Content.Headers.ContentType = new MediaTypeHeaderValue("image/jpeg");
    return response;
}

 

Now I go into Postman and POST an image to my new Azure Function endpoint. Here I uploaded a flattering picture of me and unflattering picture of The Oatmeal. He's pretty in real life just NOT HERE. ;)

Image Recognition with Azure Functions

So in just about 15 min with no idea and armed with just my browser, Postman (also my browser), Google/StackOverflow, and Azure Functions I've got a backend proof of concept.

Azure Functions supports Node.js, C#, F#, Python, PHP *and* Batch, Bash, and PowerShell, which really opens it up to basically anyone. You can use them for anything when you just want a function (or more) out there on the web. Send stuff to Slack, automate your house, update GitHub issues, act as a Webhook, etc. There's some great 3d party Azure Functions sample code in this GitHub repo as well. Inputs can be from basically anywhere and outputs can be basically anywhere. If those anywheres are also cloud services like Tables or Storage, you've got a "serverless backed" that is easy to scale.

I'm still learning, but I can see when I'd want a VM (total control) vs a Web App (near total control) vs a "Serverless" Azure Function (less control but I didn't need it anyway, just wanted a function in the cloud.)


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Psychic Weight - Dealing with the things that press on your mind

August 24, '16 Comments [34] Posted in Musings
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Close up view of man on his phone 

I was really stressed out ten years ago. I felt that familiar pressure between my eyes and felt like all the things that remained undone were pressing on me. I called it "psychic weight." I have since then collected my Productivity Tips and written extensively on the topic of productivity and getting things done. I'm going to continue to remind YOU that Self-Care Matters in between my technical and coding topics. The essence of what I learned was to let go.

The Serenity Prayer:

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
Courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.

Everyone has stress and everyone has pressure. There's no magic fix or silver bullet for stress, but I have found that some stressors have a common root cause. Things that stress me are things I think I need to do, handle, watch, take care of, worry about, sweat, deal with, or manage. These things press on me - right between my eyes - and the resulting feeling is what I call psychic weight.

For example: When the DVR (Digital Video Recorder) came out it was a gift from on high. What? A smart VCR that would just tape and hold all the TV Shows that I love? I don't have to watch shows when the time and day the shows come on? Sign me up. What a time saver!

Fast forward a few years and the magical DVR is now an infinite todo list of TV shows. It's a guilt pile. A failure queue. I still haven't watched The Wire. (I know.) It presses on me. I've actually had conversations with my wife like "ok, if we bang out the first season by staying up tonight until 4am, we should be all ready when Season 2 drops next week." Seriously. Yes, I know, Unwatched TV is a silly example. But you've binge-watched Netflix when you should have been working/reading/working out so you can likely relate.

But I'm letting go. I'll watch The Wire another time. I'll delete it from my DVR. I'm never going to watch the second season of Empire. (Sorry, Cookie. I love you Taraji!) I'm not going to read that pile of technical books on my desk. So I'm going to declare that to the universe and I'm going to remove the pile of books that's staring at me. This book stack, this failure pile is no more. And I'm not even mad. I'm OK with it.

Every deletion like this from your life opens up your time - and your mind -for the more important things you need to focus on.

What are your goals? What can you delete from your list (and I mean, DROP, not just postpone) that will free up your internal resources so you can focus on your goal?

Delete those emails. Declare email bankruptcy. They'll likely email you again. Delete a few seasons of shows you won't watch. Delete Pokemon Go. Make that stack of technical books on your desk shorter. Now, what positive thing will you fill those gaps with?

You deserve it. Remove psychic weight and lighten up. Then sound off in the comments!

* Image Copyright Shea Parikh / used under license from getcolorstock.com


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Announcing PowerShell on Linux - PowerShell is Open Source!

August 18, '16 Comments [39] Posted in Open Source | PowerShell
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I started doing PowerShell almost 10 years ago. Check out this video from 2007 of me learning about PowerShell from Jeffrey Snover! I worked in PowerShell for many years and blogged extensively,  ultimately using PowerShell to script the automation and creation of a number of large systems in Retail Online Banks around the world.

Fast forward to today and Microsoft is announcing PowerShell on Linux powered by .NET Core and it's all open source and hosted at http://GitHub.com/PowerShell/PowerShell.

Holy crap PowerShell on Linux

Jeffrey Snover predicted internally in 2014 that PowerShell would eventually be open sourced but it was the advent of .NET Core and getting .NET Core working on multiple Linux distros that kickstarted the process. If you were paying attention it's possible you could have predicted this move yourself. Parts of PowerShell have been showing up as open source:

Get PowerShell everywhere

Ok, but where do you GET IT? http://microsoft.com/powershell is the homepage for PowerShell and everything can be found starting from there.

The PowerShell open source project is at https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell and there are alphas for Ubuntu 14.04/16.04, CentOS 7.1, and Mac OS X 10.11.

To be clear, I'm told this is are alpha quality builds as work continues with community support. An official Microsoft-supported "release" will come sometime later.

What's Possible?

This is my opinion and somewhat educated speculation, but it seems to me that they want to make it so you can manage anything from anywhere. Maybe you're a Unix person who has some Windows machines (either local or in Azure) that you need to manage. You can use PowerShell from Linux to do that. Maybe you've got some bash scripts at your company AND some PowerShell scripts. Use them both, interchangeably.

If you know PowerShell, you'll be able to use those skills on Linux as well. If you manage a hybrid environment, PowerShell isn't a replacement for bash but rather another tool in your toolkit. There are lots of shells (not just bash, zsh, but also ruby, python, etc) in the *nix world so PowerShell will be in excellent company.

PowerShell on Windows

Related Links

Be sure to check out the coverage from around the web and lots of blog posts from different perspectives!

Have fun! This open source thing is kind of catching on at Microsoft isn't it?


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Visual Studio's most useful (and underused) tips

August 17, '16 Comments [100] Posted in VS2015
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There was a cool comment in my last blog post (one of many, as always, the comments > the content).

Btw, "until I realized that the Solution Explorer tree nodes are searchable." This one is a saver!

The commenter, Sam, noticed a throwaway bit in the middle of the post where I noted that the Solution Explorer was text-searchable. There's a lot of little tricks like this in Visual Studio that even the most seasoned developers sometimes miss. This phenomenon isn't limited to Visual Studio, of course. It's all software! Folks find non-obvious UX all the time in Windows, OSX, iPhone, everyday. If UX were easy then everything would be intuitive but it's not so it ain't. ;)

There's an old joke about Microsoft Office, which is known for having a zillion features.

"Most of the exciting new Office features you discover have always been in Office." - Me and Everyone Else

Here's some exceedingly useful stuff in Visual Studio (It's free to download and use, BTW) that folks often miss.

Search Solution Explorer with Ctrl+;

You can just click the text box above the Solution Explorer to search all the the nodes - visible or hidden. Or, press "Ctrl + ;"

Ctrl ; will filter the Solution Explorer

Even stuff that's DEEP in the beast. The resulting view is filtered and will remain that way until you clear the search.

Ctrl ; will filter the Solution Explorer and open subnodes

Quick Launch - Ctrl+Q

If there is one feature that no one uses and everyone should use, it's Quick Launch. Someone told me the internal telemetry numbers show that usage of Quick Launch in the single digits or lower.

Do you know that you (we) are constantly digging around in the menus for stuff? Most of you use the mouse and go Tools...Options...and stare.

Just press Ctrl+Q and type. Need to change the Font Size?

Find the Fonts Dialog quickly

Want to Compare Files? Did you know VS had that?

Compare Files

What about finding a NuGet package faster than using the NuGet Dialog?

image

Promise me you'll Ctrl+Q for a few days and see if you can make it a habit. You'll thank yourself.

Map Mode for the Scroll Bar

I love showing people features that totally surprise them. Like "I had NO IDEA that was there" type features. Try "map mode" in the Quick Launch and turn it on...then check out your scroll bar in a large file.

Map Mode for the Scroll Bar

Your scrollbar will turn into a thumbnail that you can hover over and use to navigate your file!

Map Mode turns your Scrollbar into a Scroll Thumbnail

Tab Management

Most folks manage their tabs like this.

  • Open Tab
  • Repeat
  • Declare Tab Bankruptcy
  • Close All Tabs
  • Goto 0

But you DO have both "pinned tabs" and "preview tabs" available.

Pin things you want to keep open

If you pin useful tabs, just like in your browser those tabs will stay to the left and stay open. You can not just "close all" and "close all but this" on a right click, but you can also "close all but pinned."

image

Additionally, you don't always have to double-click in the Solution Explorer to see what's in a file. That just creates a new tab that you're likely going to close anyway. Try just single clicking, or better yet, use your keyboard. You'll get a preview tab on the far right side. You'll never have more than one and preview tabs won't litter your tab list...unless you promote them.

Navigate To - Ctrl+, (Control+Comma)

Absolutely high on the list of useful things is Ctrl+, for NavigateTo. Why click around with your mouse to open a file or find a specific member or function? Press Ctrl+, and start typing. It searches files, members, type...everything. And you can navigate around with your keyboard before you hit enter.

There's basically no reason to poke around in the Solution Explorer if you already know the name of the item you want to see. Ctrl+, is very fast.

image

Move Lines with your keyboard

Yes I realize that Visual Studio isn't Emacs or VIM (unless you want it to be VsVim) but it does have a few tiny tricks that most VS users don't use.

You can move lines just by pressing Alt-up/down arrows. I've never seen anyone do this in the wild but me. You can also Shift-Select a bunch of lines and then Alt-Arrow them around as a group.

Move those lines with ALT-ARROW

You can also do Square Selection with Alt and Drag...and drag yourself a nice rectangle...then start typing to type on a dozen lines at once.

Perhaps you knew these, maybe you learned a few things. I think the larger point is to have the five to ten most useful features right there in your mind ready to go. These are mine. What are your tips?


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Visual Studio 2015 - Fixing "Dependencies npm not installed" from fsevents with node on Windows

August 14, '16 Comments [27] Posted in ASP.NET | nodejs
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Maria and I were doing some work together on Thursday and I did a clone of one of her ASP.NET Core repositories and opened it in Visual Studio 2015 Community Edition on my local machine. Some of the JavaScript tool libraries didn't load so I went back into Solution Explorer to see if there was a problem and I saw this weird error that said (or at least, I read it as) "npm not installed."

image

That's weird, since I have npm installed. I dropped out to the command line and ran:

C:\Users\scott>npm --version
3.10.5

I also ran "where" to see where (and how many) npm was installed. Side note: WHERE is super useful and not used as often as it should be by y'all.

C:\Users\scott>where npm
C:\Program Files\nodejs\npm
C:\Program Files\nodejs\npm.cmd
C:\Users\scott\AppData\Roaming\npm\npm
C:\Users\scott\AppData\Roaming\npm\npm.cmd

This looks OK as two of those npms are shell scripts and not run on Windows. Just to make sure you have the version of npm you want, Felix made a VERY useful npm-windows-upgrade utility that you run like this, ironically with npm.

npm install --global --production npm-windows-upgrade
npm-windows-upgrade

I've used this tool many times with success. It also lets you choose the exact version you want and it's very smart.

However, then I realized that Visual Studio wasn't saying that npm wasn't installed, it was saying a dependency in the npm tree below wasn't installed. That hyphen - is intended to mean something. For the record, I think this is not intuitive and is a poor UX. Perhaps it should say "package(s) not installed" but you get the idea now.

I started manually opening the tree up one item at a time looking for the bad package - while quietly swearing to myself - until I realized that the Solution Explorer tree nodes are searchable.

image

This is UX issue number two, for me. I think the "broken" library should also include the BANG (!) or warning icon over it. Regardless, now I know I can quickly do a string search.

So what's up with the fsevents library?

I can check the Visual Studio Output Window and I see this:

npm WARN install Couldn't install optional dependency: Unsupported
npm WARN EPACKAGEJSON asp.net@0.0.0 No description

I dropped out to the command prompt into to the project's folder and run "npm ls" to see an ASCII tree that effectively is the same tree you see in Visual Studio. Note the screenshot with the ASCII tree below.

The output of "npm ls" is a nice ASCII tree

What's that "UNMET OPTIONAL DEPENDENCY?" for fsevents?

Looks like fsevents is a package that is only used on OSX, so it's an optional dependency that in the case of Windows is "unmet." It's a WARNING, of sorts. Perhaps it's more an "INFO" or perhaps, one could argue, it doesn't need to be shown at all on Windows.

A quick google shows that, well, the entire world is asking the same thing. So much so that it got pretty heated in this GitHub Issue asking a similar question.

Regardless, it seems to me that something inside Visual Studio really doesn't appreciate that warning/info/notOKness and says, "hey it's not installed." The part that is missing is that, well, it doesn't need to be installed, so Visual Studio should relax.

A Fix

Here's where it gets super interesting. Visual Studio (consider it from their point of view) needs to keep things consistent so it tests with, and ships with, a version of npm.

I can check that like this:

C:\>"C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Web\External\npm.cmd" --version
3.3.4

Again, this makes sense. That way when working in a large group we can all be sure we're on the same version of stuff. When you get a new version of the Web Tools for Visual Studio, presumably this version of npm gets updated. This also means that unless you tell Visual Studio otherwise, the npm and node you get when running a build in VS is gonna be different than if you do it outside - if you stick with the default settings.

Fear not. It's easily updated. I went over to Tools | Option in Visual Studio:

Tools | Options | External Web Tools has its own list of node copies, and it doesn't include mine

See the Web\External there? I added my node installation like this and made sure it was at the top.

Tools | Options | External Web Tools has its own list of node copies, and I have ADDED my path now.

Then I right click on npm and Restore Packages and all is right with the world as now I'm using npm 3.10.5 rather than 3.3.4.

There are no npm errors anymore

The Output Window for 3.10.5 shows this different output, which apparently stresses Visual Studio out less than npm 3.3.4. (Actually I think VS is calling an npm library, rather than shelling out and parsing the "npm ls --json" payload, but you get the idea.)

npm WARN optional Skipping failed optional dependency /chokidar/fsevents:
npm WARN notsup Not compatible with your operating system or architecture: fsevents@1.0.14

Adding my global npm/node folder fixes this issue for me and I can move on.

The Weird

BUT. In my fix I'm using npm globally - it's in my %PATH%. The change I made affects all Visual Studio projects on my machine, forever.

Maybe I need to be smarter? Maybe Visual Studio is already being smart. Note the second option there in the list? It's pointing to .\node_modules\bin. That's a LOCAL node-modules folder, right? Ah, I can just add specific version of npm to packages.json there if need be on a project by project basis without affecting my entire system OR changing my Visual Studio settings, right?

However, when I run my build, it's ignoring my project's locally installed npm!

PATH=.\node_modules\.bin;C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Web\External;%PATH%;C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Web\External\git
"C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Web\External\npm.CMD" install
npm WARN install Couldn't install optional dependency: Unsupported
npm WARN EPACKAGEJSON asp.net@0.0.0 No description
npm WARN EPACKAGEJSON asp.net@0.0.0 No repository field.
npm WARN EPACKAGEJSON asp.net@0.0.0 No license field.

How can I be sure it's ignoring that relative path? I can temporarily hardcode my local node_modules, like this. Note the PATH *and* the newer output. And it works.

PATH=D:\github\sample-NerdDinner\NerdDinner.Web\node_modules\.bin;node_modules\.bin;C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Web\External;%PATH%;C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Web\External\git
"D:\github\sample-NerdDinner\NerdDinner.Web\node_modules\.bin\npm.CMD" install
npm WARN optional Skipping failed optional dependency /chokidar/fsevents:
npm WARN notsup Not compatible with your operating system or architecture: fsevents@1.0.14
npm WARN asp.net@0.0.0 No description
npm WARN asp.net@0.0.0 No repository field.
npm WARN asp.net@0.0.0 No license field.

In this screenshot below I have npm 3.10.6 installed in my project, locally, but it's not being used by Visual Studio if the path remains relative.

I am 99% sure that the relative path ".\node_modules\.bin" that's prepended to the PATH above either isn't being used OR is interfering in some way.

Am I misunderstanding how it should work? Perhaps I don't understand npm enough?

image

I'm going to continue to dig into this and I'll update this post when I have an answer. For now, I have a fix given my globally installed npm.

I've also passed my feedback/bug report onto the Visual Studio team in the form of an email with a link to this blog post. I hope this helps someone!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.